Monday, February 3, 2014

Large drug bust on PEI



Operation Clean Sweep in Charlottetown PEI resulted resulted in 40 arrests last Thursday along with the seizure of cocaine, pharmaceutical opiates, methamphetamine and marijuana. Various weapons were also seized including handguns, a rifle, a sword, a machete and a collapsible baton. This is a list of people arrested. No afiliations have been mentioned.



However, one of the guys arrested named Jeff Flynn has close ties to Bacchus and Charlottetown Harley club. He is a Hells Angels supporter. Not a big surprise.







Jeff is part of a "recovery" club.



The sad thing is that Jeff has a really nice young family and that he's no doubt going to take the fall for the people that supplied him. So when he's convicted, the big red machine will continue business as usual.



Tragically, one of the suspects arrested in this sweep is Jarred Dingwell who is the younger brother of Kyle and Dylan Dingwell. Previously we wrote about when Kyle was on a drug binge and was beating the tar out of Dylan again so Dylan pulled out a gun and shot him in self defense. Kyle is on the left in this picture with Jason Yeo in the middle. Jason is the drug dealer charged in that local home invasion. Jason Yeo was also posing in a picture with the son of the president of the Charlottetown Harley Club.

Steven frizzell is another name of suspects arrested. He was at one time kidnapped with Reggie MacDonald. A bunch of guys came over from Moncton and took them for drug debts. They were on their way to be delivered to the Hells Angels in Montreal. They were stopped before they made it to the PEI bridge. Getting people to sell drugs for them is another way the Hells Angels get people to work off their drug debts. It certainly isn't a happy life.

7 comments:

  1. It is always encouraging to hear of operations like this and their successes. However, I have to shake my head at the need to claim all of these so-called "weapons".

    The drugs are illegal - that is obvious. However, handguns, rifles, swords, machetes and batons are legal in Canada.

    I know it makes it appear there is much more of a threat to public security (it's spin doctoring to a great extent) but it affects public opinion so people think these (legal) things are wrong (and illegal) in and of themselves. Why not display the kitchen cutlery as well? I am sure the sight of a meat cleaver on an evidence display table would be more shocking than an handgun. (Why? Simply because of mass-media representations of meat-cleavers in horror movies.)

    I could see presenting firearms that are illegal (ie serial numbers filed down, being stolen property) but clearly stated as such.

    There is a need for the average person to have access to defensive means.

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  2. No doubt. I guess the concern is these weapons are being used for the commission of a criminal offense.

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  3. Of course that is probably true - however, it does have the second effect of working against the inalienable right of all people to self-defence. I say inalienable because even a cursory examination of nature shows us that all animals have been created with some form, sense and ability for self-defence. The level of self-defence is generally equivalent to the nature of the threat that is naturally (not unnaturally) imposed. This is Natural Law.

    Humans are different. Regardless of what some may try to claim we are unique and not animals. Humans have never been considered as animals until a very few proposed such an idea, which goes against rational proofs, after Darwinians proposed their theories.

    Considering the only predator of Man is Man, we, by Natural Law, need self-defence mechanisms to protect us. Considering this today takes the form of a wide gamut of high-tech weaponry, we all need equal and fair access to such.

    Reading your previous story about Reggie MacDonald, if he and his family and neighbours all had access to equivalent self-defensive measures as the drug dealers had, they would never have come to his home and harassed him.

    There is the Criminal Code law in Canada of Trespass at Night (117). That is the only Criminal Code law regarding trespassing - there is no law in Canada against it trespass during the day (there may be local statutes and provincial Acts). If something of this nature were to happen, I would think each responsible citizen should be adequately armed (and trained!) to enforce such a law and those men who showed up at the house should have been confronted by the parents with appropriate arms and arrested (any citizen in Canada has the right to a 'Citizen's Arrest' for an indictable offence and different provinces allow different responses, such as B.C. does not allow private arrest for trespassing alone, but Ontario does).

    People need to know the law as well as be trained in self-defence and have ready access to the means of self-defence.

    EVERYONE of legal age should have a Purchase and Acquisition Licence (PAL) for non-restricted (rifles and shotguns) and restricted (handguns) firearms.

    EVERYONE needs to be trained in safe and effective handling of their firearms.

    EVERYONE needs to know their rights in carrying one.

    If everyone had something like a Winchester, Mossberg, Remington, Benelli, etc tactical shotgun with folding/collapsible stock with easy to remove trigger lock and alternating slugs with tactical buck shot (buck shot is for killing large game, bird shot is for just that, birds (small game) behind the seat of their car, it would make Canada a LOT safer of a place to live. A slug will penetrate the metal of a vehicle and the shot will ... well, you get the idea. Each has its purpose and each is effective, but one must be trained (to be both safe and willing).

    [Naysayers will whine that they will then get stolen from all the cars - however, why would you leave it in the car? You take it with you. They are very small and can be carried in small fishing bags or backpacks. No one ever need know you have one, if you carry it properly.]

    The first line of home defence, though, is a well-trained dog. That will help ensure you have enough time to retrieve your home-defence gear when you need it.

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    1. "EVERYONE needs to know their rights in carrying one." I didn't know we had any such rights in Canada. I know you can carry a non restricted firearm in your car but handguns are restricted and are just for taking to the gun range. Otherwise they have to be locked up with trigger locks on them.

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    2. "I didn't know we had any such rights in Canada".

      Well you did under British Common Law......certain property rights as well.....but then those were replaced by the "Charter of Rights and Freedoms".....which not surprisingly defined what rights and freedoms you had....and which just happened to be slightly less than what you had before....but why should this be a surprise......whenever you have a piece of legislation with a high minded title you can be pretty sure it's not really what it's name says it is.

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    3. Any rights held under British Common Law would continue under the Charter of Rights. Nothing in that document took them away. It just entrenched the basic rights similar to the US Bill of Rights.

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    4. A tactical shotgun is NOT a restricted firearm. That classification is based upon barrel length of 440mm (under this length and it becomes restricted in classification) and total reduced length has to be 660mm or more (anything under 660mm is deemed to be restricted).

      So, any of those shotguns with a folding stock will be over 660mm and you can easily carry one in a sling hanging down on your side that will be completely covered by a medium length coat.

      You still have the right to carry it openly in Canada, but if you do, you risk a "hard" take down by local authorities. Just make sure it is unloaded and has a trigger lock on it. I do not recommend openly carrying into a bank while making a withdrawal at the teller - however, it is perfectly legal to do so.

      Trigger locks come in many different types. Keyed ones may be the most common, but if you do not have your key handy … Combination locks are better (just keep one number one away from release).

      Take the Firearms Safety Course and get your hunting licence as well and you will undoubtedly be told a lot of good information by the instructors (or talk with them before/after classes and they will tell what the laws are and how to get authorizations to transport for restricted firearms that are more than just to a specific range and home).

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