Sunday, April 24, 2016

Hamilton cop alleges betrayal by his force



As one bog reader has pointed out the Toronto Star is reporting that "Former undercover officer suing police services board, alleging they failed to protect him - and making explosive allegations of police corruption." At first I thought it sounded like another Jay Dobbins case where the law enforcement agency that hired him to go under cover left him high and dry. However, this case goes far beyond that. They didn't just fail to protect him, they blew his cover.

"Manning alleges his identity was revealed by a high-ranking police colleague to a Hamilton crime family because Manning’s undercover work was close to exposing the officer’s criminal activity. Manning’s lawsuit includes a long list of explosive allegations of police corruption in Hamilton, which Manning claims to have learned about from his police duties and undercover work, including his network of informants, two of whom have since died violently."

CHCH is reporting that "In the court documents, Manning describes how he was attacked one night by four men while undercover. Mr. Thomas Riordan said directly to Mr. Manning, “hey cop”, before without warning all four males simultaneously began to assault Mr. Manning. Mr. Manning fought back and retreated to his undercover apartment. Manning claims he called his “handler” after the attack and was told a police cruiser was outside waiting for him. He alleges when he went outside, the same four guys attacked him again, this time with knives as an unmarked police vehicle drove by."

This is significant because it was related to a Hamilton crime family. That is the headquaters of the Calabrians who were battling the Rizzutos for control of the Montreal drug trade.

The Toronto Star summarizes that Among Manning’s claims in his lawsuit:

Hamilton police officers fraudulently claimed reward money from Crime Stoppers, and others were involved in “ripping off” drug dealers and marijuana grow operations.

Two officers have been ‘on the take’ since the ’80s. They would pay reward money to a relative and then split the proceeds.

A senior Hamilton officer sold information about the investigation into the unsolved 1998 murders of criminal lawyer Lynn Gilbank and her husband, Fred. It’s believed Gilbank may have been the subject of a gangland hit at her Ancaster home.

Several Hamilton police officers have ties to organized crime and the Hells Angels. Manning also names a Toronto officer he alleges was selling guns to Toronto gang members.

He and his wife were falsely detained and their rural home subject to an improper search by Hamilton police, who told him they had received a tip and came looking for a marijuana grow op.

It appears that this is just the tip of the iceberg so to speak.



Perhaps this all relates to Bob Deasy's book Being Uncle Charlie. Which teletubby was it that helped the Hells Angels take over the Hamilton drug trade from the Outlaws? Was it the Po Po?

In Alberta the Edmonton Police Service has a bad reputation for passing on intel to the Hell Angels. This was confirmed by the Calgary Police Department who saw members of the EPS partying with Hells Angels in Calgary. This sheds light on part of the problem. Many cops who investigate the Hells Angels do so because they covet that life. They covet the strippers and blow lifestyle. For most normal family men, that lifestyle does not apeal to them. It is concerneing when so many police officers covet that life. IHIT in Surrey was the same however I understand there have been improvements made in that department since the Surrey Six disaster.

Alberta solved the problem with their gang task force ALERT who recently made a huge HA bust in Edmonton. Now we have to ask if the Alberta government are going to disband ALERT for doing such a good job like the BC government keeps doing. Our gang task force keeps getting infiltrated by idiots. Right now it appears that the BEU need to have a peak at what's really going on in Hamilton as it is no doubt tied to the rising HA / Rizzuto recovery.

7 comments:

  1. And this is only further proof that the one time "Code" that existed within the world of organized crime is a thing of the past. It is funny how gangsters run around calling each other rats, yet 'gangsters' are working hand in hand with the police at the highest levels. This has now been proven with undeniable certainty from coast to coast. 'News flash' to all the gangsters far and wide. Using cops that are corrupt or on the take to do your bidding is no different that ratting out. How can people really expect others to live by a so called code when so very few appear to do so. The world of organized crime is a selfish, dirty world where people only care about themselves. There is a much better way to live.

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    1. Indeed. However, I can see how in their mind, ratting someone out to the cops and using a dirty cop to further their own criminal enterprise could be considered different. You're absolutely right in that it ultimately just proves their own selfish greed but it's not betraying their own directly like being a police informant is. I guess its more of a double standard as you have pointed out and yes there is indeed a much better way to live.

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  2. Well that may explain a few things about Hamilton and crime. Interesting.

    Perhaps it is time police departments had a code of conduct and then enforced it. rules which might be included could be: thou shalt not party with members of organized crime, unless of course they are family members.

    If police officers are attending parties thrown by the H. A. and other such organizations, the officer might want to be "interviewed" by their superiors and "counselled" on what is "appropriate" behaviour. It is doubtful banks would continue to employ bank tellers who partied with bank robbers, especially if they were all "conducting" business in the same area.

    We have game rules like the separation of church and state, perhaps we need a rule about criminals and cops.

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    1. Yes but we have the same problems here in BC. Like the off duty cops who attended parties at Piggy's Palace. Those clowns coveted that lifestyle which is difficult to comprehend since Piggy's Palace was so sleazy.

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  3. That huge bust in Edmonton amounted to nothing really... Dom got convicted and was given 6 years... aside from that, the most significant outcome is a 60 day sentence. All the Criminal Enterprise charges and, robbery, intimidation charges were tossed out. Not quite the significant blow to organized crime ALERT made it out to be...

    http://edmontonjournal.com/news/crime/timeouts-arent-just-for-kids-hells-angels-told-to-take-anger-management-courses-after-skirmish-with-rival-bikers

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    1. I think it was very significant. A full patch HA was caught with just under 2 kilos of cocaine and was sentenced to six years in prison. That's better than house arrest or having an associate take the fall. It was the very HA that supplied the entire Whiteboy Posse. That was what was so significant about it.

      As for the link, I had seen that before but didn't notice that is was a group assault. Several HAs ganged up on one guy. 14 guys, 10 HAs and four associated gave the boots to one Warlock who was a bodybuilder. They were intimidated by him so they ganged up on him.

      Interesting how several of the members involved subsequently had their criminal organization charges dropped in a magic plea deal in the drug bust. All the drug dealers were involved with jumping that one guy. The old fight me fight my gang mentality. Certainly not very noble. Dom is tiny.

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    2. With all due respect, it was not the police who made the bust amount to nothing. That was the courts.

      Good cops who see the courts reduce their work to next to nothing must be quite upset, to say the least.

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